Great Plains Communications Residential Blog

Keeping Your Family Connected

Tag: solar eclipse

Looking Back at Past Eclipses

Did you know that scientists believe they have evidence of a total solar eclipse dated as far back as November 30, 3340 B.C.? According to our cable channel, History, “A series of circular and spiral-shaped petroglyphs at the Loughcrew Megalithic Monument in County Meath, Ireland, are believed to correspond to a total solar eclipse visible in the region on that date.”

Since then, documents around the world have recorded findings of a solar eclipse, from the Shu Ching (an ancient Chinese book of documents), to ancient Greek historian, Herodotus. In 585 B.C., Herodotus recorded that the total solar eclipse, “brought about an unexpected ceasefire between two warring nations, the Lydians and the Medes, who had been fighting for control of Anatolia (modern-day Turkey) for five years.” Find more about historic eclipses here on the History channel’s website.

Just as these were recorded, the eclipse on August 21, 2017 will go down in history. Please be sure to view the natural phenomenon safely. If you question the authenticity of your solar glasses, check out our blog for a checklist given by NASA.

Solar Eclipse Safety Tips from NASA

The total solar eclipse is less than a week away. By this time, people have picked out their camping spots and are quickly making sure they have enough solar glasses to go around. Great Plains Communications is excited that we in Nebraska will have a prime view, but also want to caution viewers about some solar eclipse safety reminders.

While it is common sense not to stare at the sun on a normal day, this is the same advice given for a partially eclipsed sun. However, with the special protection of the solar filters in something like solar glasses or solar binoculars, you and your loved ones can safely view the sun. Be sure to keep your glasses on throughout the entire eclipse transition, as even just a sliver of the sun can damage vision to a naked eye.

Want to make sure your glasses meet NASA’s safety criteria? Below we have listed the checklist provided on NASA’s website.

  • Have certified information with a designated ISO 12312-2 international standard
  • Have the manufacturer’s name and address printed somewhere on the product
  • Should NOT be used if they are older than three years, or have scratched or wrinkled lenses
  • Do NOT use homemade filters
  • Ordinary sunglasses – even very dark ones – should NOT be used as a replacement for eclipse viewing glasses or handheld solar viewers

While this is a very exciting event, we hope everyone stays safe and enjoys this rare and beautiful natural phenomenon.