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Tag: daylight saving time

Three Things You May Not Know About Daylight Saving Time

This Sunday, March 12, 2017 we will “spring forward” in recognition of daylight saving time. As there has been talk and even a bill proposed to end the recognition of daylight saving time in Nebraska, Great Plains Communications wanted to share a few facts about why we adjust our clocks twice a year.

  1. “Daylight Saving Time” vs. “Daylight Savings Time”

You will often see people refer to it as “daylight savings time”, when in fact that is incorrect. Since the word “saving” is acting as an adjective rather than a verb, it should be written in singular form to be grammatically correct.

  1. The United States was not the first country to recognize daylight saving time

Germany was the first country to enact daylight saving time on April 30, 1916 in steps to conserve electricity during World War I. Shortly after, the United Kingdom did the same, introducing “summer time.” The United States didn’t adopt daylight saving until 1918.

  1. Not everybody in the United States changes their clocks

Both Hawaii and Arizona do not observe daylight saving time, as well as Guam, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. Some Amish communities also choose to remain on standard time year-round.

Time to Set The Clocks Back – Daylight Saving Time

It is a common misconception that daylight saving time was created in the aid of farmers, to allow an extra hour of sunlight to work their fields. As we turn our clocks back this Sunday, November 6, 2016, Great Plains Communications has teamed up with our cable channel, History Channel to bring you the real reason we “fall back” and “spring forward”.

The real reason we adjust our clocks twice a year is based on energy conservation and a attempt to match daylight hours to times when the majority of people are awake, dating back to 1895. According to the History Channel, “the first real experiments with daylight saving time began during World War I,” on April 30, 1916. In an effort to conserve electricity needed for war effort, Germany and Austria enforced a one-hour clock shift. The United States later adopted daylight saving in 1918.